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neo-japanesque:

paintings by canadian artist jason de graaf

This guy.

NANA —- !!!

NANA —- !!!

AW YEAH !!!

AW YEAH !!!

the-science-llama:

Perseid Meteor Shower
If you have never heard of the Fluxtimator before, it’s this tool that estimates the meteor shower rates for you. So you select the time, location and the name of the meteor shower and it will give you some numbers on what to expect. I found it to be fairly accurate over the last few meteor showers I watched.
I made this gif showing the next few days for the Perseids this year. I selected Phoenix because I live near there and as you see it is expected to max out around 89 apparently. It stops at around 6am because that’s when the Sun rises and around the 14th you can see a dip forming on the left side of the line. That is from the Moon getting brighter (waxing) and rising earlier trying to ruin the show, but good thing it was a few days late this year.
If you read my article on the Perseids already you would know that more-southern areas will see lower rates. If you go a little bit more north than 33 degrees latitude (Phoenix) some areas will reach rates of over a 100!
(I know right, but make sure you get away from light pollution and also being on a mountain helps)
But the point for this is you can start watching for Perseids now! It is definitely not too early. I already saw some Perseid fireballs a few days ago along with some Delta Aquarids last week. You will definitely see more and more fireballs as the days progress towards the peak, and according to NASA, the Perseids produce the most fireballs out of all the other meteor showers.
So get on out there fellow stargazers, look up at night and enjoy the show! And if you want to try and photograph some meteors or just need some awesome jams to listen to, take this with you.

the-science-llama:

Perseid Meteor Shower

If you have never heard of the Fluxtimator before, it’s this tool that estimates the meteor shower rates for you. So you select the time, location and the name of the meteor shower and it will give you some numbers on what to expect. I found it to be fairly accurate over the last few meteor showers I watched.

I made this gif showing the next few days for the Perseids this year. I selected Phoenix because I live near there and as you see it is expected to max out around 89 apparently. It stops at around 6am because that’s when the Sun rises and around the 14th you can see a dip forming on the left side of the line. That is from the Moon getting brighter (waxing) and rising earlier trying to ruin the show, but good thing it was a few days late this year.

If you read my article on the Perseids already you would know that more-southern areas will see lower rates. If you go a little bit more north than 33 degrees latitude (Phoenix) some areas will reach rates of over a 100!

(I know right, but make sure you get away from light pollution and also being on a mountain helps)

But the point for this is you can start watching for Perseids now! It is definitely not too early. I already saw some Perseid fireballs a few days ago along with some Delta Aquarids last week. You will definitely see more and more fireballs as the days progress towards the peak, and according to NASA, the Perseids produce the most fireballs out of all the other meteor showers.

So get on out there fellow stargazers, look up at night and enjoy the show! And if you want to try and photograph some meteors or just need some awesome jams to listen to, take this with you.

beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood:

x (Smoothie recipe)

You can use almond milk instead of goat milk…

check out this boss lettering/animation

RAINBOW ROCKS

Who WOULDN’T want this hanging in their room?

tedx:

A dad and son send a take-out container to space: The Brooklyn Space Program at TEDxYouth@BFS

At TEDxYouth@BFS, self-described “tinkerer” Luke Geissbuhler introduced TEDx’ers to The Brooklyn Space Program — a DIY space mission launched by Luke and his 7-year-old son Max. With some creativity, research, and ingenuity, the pair turned a Thai food take-out container into a spacecraft that traveled to altitudes above 100,000 feet and battled 100 MPH winds and temperatures -60 degrees Fahrenheit — all so Max could learn by doing, not just watching.

From Luke’s talk:

[The Brooklyn Space Program] is a project I did about 2 years ago with my son Max that took us about 8 months to complete, off and on. Essentially, we built a spacecraft out of a cell phone, hand warmers, some foam insulation, and a Thai food takeout container … Reaching the upper stratosphere at 120,000 feet, this homemade capsule could travel 4x higher than a jet liner; photograph the blackness of space, the curvature of the Earth; and safely land again in an hour and a half.

People ask me all the time how I knew how to pull off this crazy mission without any engineering or science background, and all I can tell them is that I’ve done an awful lot of tinkering in my life … I was kind of the poster child for project-based learning — it was often the only way I could learn something.

Above, watch the amazing footage from the Brooklyn Space Program’s initial launch, and watch Luke’s whole talk about nontraditional learning and the DIY space mission here.

It only took an hour to reach space… unbelievable!